Scandi Kitchen

Although my kitchen is still relatively new, last week unfortunately I had to have the worktops replaced and I thought this would be a good opportunity to share what I learnt from buying a kitchen for the first time – and of course to show you the new worktops!

It was about two years ago now that my kitchen renovation was completed, you can see what it looked like then here. I was unbelievably happy with it, it was a million miles better than what it was when I moved in (no more magnolia and no more mucky brown coloured floor tiles), I had so much more storage space and design wise it was exactly how I’d imagined it. Sadly it only took a few months for the beautiful oak worktops to start splitting around the hob, yes, months. Now we all know that kitchens aren’t exactly cheap rooms to have renovated, and mine wasn’t a case of replacing the cupboards or anything like that, the entire kitchen had to be moved to the opposite side of the room, which meant pipes had to be moved, the ceiling had to come down and be boarded and plastered again, the tiles had to come up, the entire kitchen was taken out and we started from scratch. I spent the most I’ve ever spent on this one room, so when my brand new worktops started to split just a few months from being brand new, I was devastated. Now the problems started here; you see, I brought my kitchen from a local kitchen supplier, however, said kitchen supplier doesn’t fit the kitchens himself or as part of his business – he sub-contracts builders for that part. When I first reported the problem, the supplier and the builders’ solution was to fill the splits with wood filler – not really ideal but I went ahead with it because I’d just got rid of the builders and had a clean and tidy house, I was in no rush to have them back doing work again. But alas, the oak started to split in other places around the hob, I soon realised that this was a manufacturing problem – it clearly wasn’t fit for purpose. I went back to the supplier, he got in touch with the manufacturer and luckily the oak worktop was under warranty – phew. At least it would be provided it had been fitted as per the manufacturers fitting instructions. But had it been fitted to meet those requirements? Nope. This meant that the manufacturer wouldn’t replace it or refund for it (even though it most likely was a manufacturing problem), the way it had been fitted was their get out clause and left me with the kitchen supplier and the builders going back and forth about whose fault it was and ultimately who should foot the bill to fix the problem. The builders didn’t want to pay for a new worktop (even though they had fitted it incorrectly), and they certainly didn’t want to do a couple of days of free labour removing the faulty one and fitting another worktop in its place. At that point I think the plan was that the supplier would pay for the new worktop and the builders would fit it FOC, essentially split the blame and solve it together, but a year and a half later and I still had no resolution and no date to get it sorted. I was getting increasingly irritated, and eventually after several conversations and one particularly aggressive text message from one of the builders, I refused to have them do the job, I didn’t feel comfortable having them in my house if I’m perfectly honest. At the end of the day, I was their customer and having worked in customer service, that is just not the way to deal with people. Here we are two years later and finally the supplier recommended another builder, (who was fabulous – I would 100% get him back in to do more work in the future), he did the job within three days and I can’t fault him or his work. So I’m happy with my kitchen once again. I know this isn’t exactly a first world problem guys, but when it happens to you and you’ve paid so much of your own money, it really is upsetting. So what did I learn from this? Next time I have to buy a kitchen, I will make sure it’s through a company that offer both the buying and the fitting. That way if I have any problems (which touch wood I wouldn’t), there’s no question about who needs to deal with it in order to get anything resolved, and I would highly recommend the same to anyone else looking at buying a kitchen.

But anyway… since there was a very happy ending for this kitchen in the end, and since I was having the worktop taken out anyway, I thought I may as well upgrade the sink and tap at the same time. Why? Mainly because I’ve been lusting after gold and copper sinks for a few years now (Pinterest can take full responsibility for that), but secondly, the previous sink had a fixed draining board, which was useful yes but took up quite a lot of space on the worktop. So I went with a single gold sink and tap to match from the amazing Olif Design. There will be a full blog post coming soon dedicated to this beauty of a sink and tap though so that I can talk about it properly in all it’s glory.

Now my kitchen used to be all copper accessories, but now I’ve made the commitment to get a gold sink and tap installed, I thought I should balance the metallics out a bit better, plus they do look great mixed in my opinion. I still love copper don’t get me wrong, but I have a feeling that the gold trend will outlive the copper trend! So I headed to one of my favourite stores – Holly’s House, with plenty of choice when it comes to gold accessories – and utensils yes!! Plus a few quirky bits like the most adorable flamingo salt and pepper set – these really are not me, but I just fell in love with them and I think they add a tiny bit of quirkiness to my very minimal kitchen, what do you think? You might remember my previous post on Holly’s House – they stock so many of my favourite Scandi brands, Ferm Living, Bloomingville, Hubsch and more – so make sure you head over to take a look – you won’t regret it. I’ve linked everything from Holly’s House here:

Flamingo Salt & Pepper Set

Gold Pizza Cutter

Gold Grater

Gold Serving Spoon

Gold Ladle

Brass Salad Servers

Hexagon Brass Bottle Opener

Rose Hexagon Vase (Used as a utensil holder)

Brass Hexagon Vase (Used as a utensil holder)

Brass Tray

If there’s something else that you’d like to know where it’s from just drop me a comment below and I’ll get back to you! Right enough of my rambling, I’ve gotta dash because I haven’t done my packing and I fly to Pisa tomorrow!!! Eeeeeek!

Speak soon x

*This post is in collaboration with Holly’s House but as always my opinions are my own.

Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

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Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

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Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

 

Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen

Scandi Kitchen